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RLOAA Home – Reserve Law Officers Association of America

2004 June 16

Reserve Law Officers Association of America (reslaw)

“Voice of the Volunteer Lawmen”
P.O. Box 17807, San Antonio, TX 78217-0807

Telephone: 210-653-5754 / FAX: 210-653-9655

Founded January, 1970 to serve the needs of the third of a million volunteer peace officers of America, this non-profit fraternal organization is tax exempt under Internal Revenue Service Code 501(C)4. In 27 years, the Association has enrolled members in over 2,500 cities and 50 StatesOtto Vehle, the National Director since 1972, is also Chairman of the Board of Directors. A Lieutenant in the Support Division, Bexar County Sheriff’s Office, San Antonio, Texas. he holds a Texas Peace Officer license with Basic, Intermediate, and Advanced Proficiency certificates.

Late in 1960 the Attorney General of Texas ruled that volunteer peace officers were not legal because the Texas Legislature had never authorized them.

Concerned volunteers from all across the state went to the State Capitol in Austin to seek help from their Legislators. While there, many of them met other volunteers for the first time. They all learned that in order to be successful at getting legislation passed, they needed to band together, prepare their proposals, and then make a united appeal. Taking this advice, they formed a statewide organization called the Auxiliary Police and Reserve Law Officers Association of Texas.

President of this group was Otto Vehle, Chief of the Police Reserves in Sherman, Texas. This organization prepared a Bill and took it to the next Legislative Session. In a unified group, they testified for the Reserve Law, and it passed, setting minimum standards of training and education and giving legal status to volunteer law enforcement.

When law enforcement agencies all across America learned of the successful work done in Texas, Police Chiefs and Sheriffs in many states began to request assistance in getting similar legislation passed in their states. It became obvious that the country needed a nationwide organization, so it was decided to change the name from a Texas group to a new national name, Reserve Law Officers Association of America. Almost overnight the membership swelled and in its first year members in over forty states had already enrolled.

Now, 27 years later, this strong organization, Reserve Law Officers Association of America, is the powerful national voice for volunteer peace officers and the many fulltime, paid peace officers in its membership.

No ad solicitations

Anyone who has been connected with law enforcement for any time at all has heard tales of fraudulent organizations that solicit funds in the name of police or sheriff departments when in fact they have no connection to these departments.
We condemn the illegal fundraising which has occurred from time to time in the name of legitimate law enforcement groups.
Many investigations have shown that the “ads” sold in “boiler rooms” often never get printed and the money raked in goes to the solicitors and the promoters.
This obviously proves to be extremely embarrassing to the law enforcement agency involved, and usually the promoters escape punishment by means of tricky disclaimers . . . or they just skip town and set up shop all over again.
Reserve Law Officers Association of America does not sell ads, nor does it permit anyone else to do so on its behalf. This Association operates solely on the dues paid by its members.

Here’s more information: - – - click on Blue desired item below:

APPLICATION for Membership in Reserve Law Officers Association of America Application
BENEFITS of Membership in the Reserve Law Officers Association Benefits

HISTORY and background on the Reserve Law Officers Association

History

PENAL CODE changes to be proposed in Texas Penal Code
LEGISLATIVE  Updates: laws, proposed legislation, things to watch for     Legislation
Texas Attorney General OPINION on officer off-duty employment A.G.Opinion
Bexar County Sheriff Support Division (RESERVES) Support
Volunteers TAX DEDUCTION, Internal Revenue Service Code, Amendment I.R.S. Amend
Volunteers under Fair LABOR Standards Act Labor
Volunteer Protections Act of 1997 reduces reserves’ LIABILITY Protection
Quick LINKS  to various other law enforcement agencies LAWLINK
PURPOSES of the Reserve Law Officers Association of America               Purposes
Define “PEACE OFFICER” in Texas Code of Criminal Procedure CCP
Texas Reserve Officers, Andy Thrash (Houston) Houston
SOUTH CAROLINA volunteer peace officers S._Carolina
British reserves (volunteer) law enforcement officers – UNITED KINGDOM British

STUDY: An in-depth look at the background and future possibilities for changes in Texas . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Booklet

NEW: Changes in Texas Concealed Handgun law . . . . . Texas Guns

HOT! Security industry not secure . . . . Security Guard

Do Policemen go to Heaven? . . . Heaven

Bexar Support

2003 June 15

SUPPORT DIVISION

Bexar County Sheriff’s Office
San Antonio, Texas

Ralph Lopez
Sheriff

Rolando Tafolla
Chief Deputy


SUPPORT DIVISION STAFF

  •  COMMANDER – Captain Roger Apolinar
    SPECIAL SERVICES – Lt. Don Marshall 

    FINANCE – Sgt. Dan Remmers
    RECORDS & TRAINING – James Cornell and Charles Perrington


  • INVESTIGATIONS – Lieutenant Joe Lopez 

  • Criminal Warrants – Sgt. Thomas Heinrich and Sgt. David Glasscock


UNIFORMED SERVICES – Lieutenant
PATROL – Sgt. Frank Serrata
ORGANIZED CRIME - 


  • MAGISTRATE COURT – Lieutenant Joe Perez
  • COURT SECURITY – Sgt. Wayne Brown

 The Alamo 

Located in downtown San Antonio, The Alamo represents Texas history.
It is the site of a decisive battle by Texans for independence from Mexico.


What is the Support Division?

The Support Division of the Bexar County Sheriff’s Office is one of the oldest volunteer law enforcement groups in America.

It was known as the Bexar County Sheriff Reserves until the present Sheriff Ralph Lopez took office in 1992. At that time, Sheriff Lopez decided that every volunteer Deputy in the Support Division would be required to hold at least aBasic Peace Officer license (Texas requires 560 hours training for Peace Officer license). The Sheriff ruled that holders of Reserve Law Enforcement Officer licenses would no longer be a part of the Division.

Texas law requires all Peace Officers to complete 40 hours of In-Service training every two years to maintain their licenses. A great believer in good training, Sheriff Lopez mandates his deputies must have 40 hours of In-Service trainingevery year.

The are more than 200 Volunteer Deputies in the Support Division Those active commit themselves to serve a minimum of 16 hours per month. The current average is approximately 30 hours a month.

Support Division deputies save Bexar County taxpayers
well over half a million dollars a year.

Support Division members come from all walks of life. Some are young people looking toward a future in law enforcement who will use this experience to move up into that career. On the other hand, several are retired Sheriff Deputies and Police, including two former San Antonio Chiefs of Police and some Deputy Chiefs.

As you can see by the Staff assignments above, Support Division officers are utilized in nearly all areas of the Sheriff’s Office to supplement law enforcement manpower. Like paid deputies, the volunteers are professionally trained, State-licensed, and duly sworn Peace Officers. They are assigned to the same duties as paid officers.

In general, Support Division deputies are volunteers who are not compensated for their normal duty time. The Division is comprised of individuals who want to contribute to the safety and well-being of their community as well as those who desire to work into law enforcement careers. Many law enforcement agencies consider the merits and accomplishments of their volunteer deputies for filling full-time paid positions before seeking outside applicants.

There are two levels of licenses issued by the Texas Commission On Law Enforcement Officer
Standards and Education (TCLEOSE). They are:

1) RESERVE LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER LICENSE

A person who holds a Reserve Law Enforcement Officer license is considered to be a “Reserve”. These persons are “peace officers” only when called to duty. They may carry a weapon only “while in the actual discharge of official duties”. Certificates of qualification for Reserves are:

  1. Basic Reserve (requires 228 hours training)

  2. Intermediate Reserve (requires 190 hours training)

  3. Advanced Reserve (requires 142 hours training.) The 560 hours training is  sufficient for Basic Peace Officer license.

2) PEACE OFFICER LICENSE

All Peace Officers have the same law enforcement powers, whether paid or unpaid. At this time, 560 hours of training is the minimum TCLEOSE requirement. Four levels of achievement may be obtained by Peace Officers. They are:

  1. Basic Peace Officer

  2. Intermediate Peace Officer

  3. Advanced Peace Officer

  4. Master Peace Officer

SUPPORT DIVISION ENTRY REQUIREMENTS

In addition to requiring a Peace Officer License, the basic minimum requirements for applicants to the Support Division are:

  • Minimum 21 years old (no maximum age)

  • High school diploma or G.E.D.

  • Good physical conditioning

  • Valid Texas driver’s license

  • No criminal convictions.

Applicant must hold a Peace Officer license; pass a physical examination; pass a psychological examination; and be approved by a Review Board comprised of fulltime regular and  Support Division officers.

  Interested in joining?

Persons interested in becoming a part of the Support Division of the Bexar County Sheriff’s Office should contact:
Captain Roger Apolinar

Lt. Billy Davenport died on Sept. 2, 2002. Joined the Bexar County Sheriff Reserve in 1979, was a key member of the Gang Unit, served in Special Assignments. He averaged 53 hours per month in time donated and in at least six years his donated time exceeded 1,000 hours. Nick E. Espiritu died on September 7, 2002.  He joined the Bexar County Sheriff Reserve in 1963 and served honorably until 1994. Nick was a familiar face around the Bexar County Courthouse where he served many years with Court Security.

  Return to Home Page       Last modified 15 June 2003

Don McCall

2003 March 12

Hello!  


This is the Home Page of
Don McCall
Sergeant 
Police Department
City of Alamo Heights, Texas

Alamo Heights Police Department
6116 Broadway
San Antonio, Texas 78209

  • Dispatcher . . . . . . . . (210) 822-3321

  • Administration . . . . . . . . . .(210) 822-6433

  • Investigations . . . . .(210) 822-2164

  • Warrants . . . . . (210) 822-2948

  • EMERGENCY . . 911
    Incorporated 1922

    A My law enforcement career has varied:

    • I have been a Certified and Commissioned Peace Officer since 1974 and have served City, County, and State Agencies in Texas.

    I have been employed by the Alamo Heights Police Department for 15 years and have served in the capacity of Patrolman, Corporal, Warrant Officer and Sergeant.

    • A little information on my background:

    I hold a Texas Peace Officer license with Master Proficiency certificate, and Instructor certificate. I have earned an Associate Arts degree from San Antonio College and a Bachelor of Science degree from Wayland Baptist University in Criminal Justice.

    I have been married to my wonderful wife Tonya for 18 years and have two fantastic kids.

    My hobbies include flying, boating, motorcycles,
    traveling and studying history of any kind.


    Our sailboat at Canyon Lake Marina

    I have a fully equipped IFR certified personal airplane. In February, 1998 I completed a cross country trip to Walker’s Cay and other islands in the Caribbean.  I have also completed my multi-engine commercial rating.

    Fraternities: Masonic – Texas Lodge #8, Scottish Rite, Valley of San Antonio.

    Member, Castle Hills First Baptist Church, San Antonio, Texas

    I’m always interested in law enforcement and in aviation matters.

United Kingdom Police Reserve

2002 July 13

Reserve Law Officers

Association of America

The United Kingdom

Police Reserve

The ‘Special Constable’ is the United Kingdom’s Reserve Law Officer. The name dates back more than 700 years to the time before paid policemen when the preservation of the peace was a common law unpaid duty.

Today there are about 15,000 Special Constables in the UK, each a sworn Constable in one of the 54 individual police forces of the British Isles. Northern Ireland has a different reserve organisation. A Special Constable (SC) has the same police powers as a Police Constable (PC), on or off duty, except that they are limited to their own and any contiguous force area. The British Transport Police now use SC’s and they have police powers on and near railway property throughout the British Isles.

The uniform of a SC is now almost identical to that of a PC, except for a small SC+Crown insignia, which is worn on the epaulets to identify the SC to other police officers. Some forces have recently abolished the SC+Crown insignia and now identify a SC by the shoulder number starting with an 8 or 9. In August 1996 a Home Office working party report stated that it was more important for SC’s to be recognised as such within the service than by the public.

Special Constabularies in England and Wales have their own grade structure in place of ranks, which are used in Regular Forces. In Scotland, Special Constabularies do not have grade structure.  With some local variations, in England and Wales, they are normally as follows:

GRADE

GRADE

RANK

EPAULET INSIGNIA

County Special Constable

Metropolitan Special Constable

Regular Constable

Special Constable

Special Constable Special Constable Police Constable Number + SC
Section Officer Sub-Divisional  Officer Sergeant Number + One Bar + SC
Area or Divisional Officer Divisional Officer Inspector Two Bars + SC
Chief Area or Divisional Officer Area Commandant Chief Inspector Three Bars + SC
Chief Officer  or Commandant Chief Commandant Assistant Chief Constable Four Bars + SC

The grade structure is used for administration purposes and for events policed solely by SC’s. A PC is always senior whenever they accompany a SC, irrespective of the SC’s grade.

SC’s are recruited between the ages of 18½ and 50, and normally retire at 55, although they may continue to 60 on a yearly extension basis, subject to fitness. All grades are unpaid volunteers; uniforms and all equipment are provided free. Out of pocket expenses and travel costs are reimbursed.

Basic training upon acceptance is spread over twelve weeks, after which a magistrate swears in the SC and they receive their uniform and warrant card. Once operational, training continues with a rolling programme during the SC’s two-year probationary period after which authority for independent patrol, driving police vehicles, supervisory grades, etc. may be achieved.

The same as PC’s, SC’s do not routinely carry firearms. All forces train and issue SC’s with rigid handcuffs, batons and CS incapacitant sprays for restraint and defence, and protective vests are now being issued to SCs.

Deployment of SC’s varies between individual forces, from accompanying PC’s on mobile or foot patrol, independent vehicle patrol, special events, pro-active targeting, special operations, etc. In many forces SC’s are now being given their own targeted policing objectives such as focusing on anti-social behaviour of young people on housing estates, Neighbourhood Watch schemes and attending low priority commitments. All of which release PC’s to concentrate on more serious incidents.

SC’s work both in uniform and plain clothes and the minimum commitment required is 16 hours operational duty per month.

There is no representative association for SC’s in the UK at present, although the Police Federation, which represents PC’s, has recently indicated it may be prepared to accept SC’s into it’s membership. A quarterly magazine ‘Special Beat’ is produced by the Home Office and distributed by post to all SC’s.

Recently the Home Office have implemented a number of changes in the conditions of service for SC’s, such as injury on duty compensation, legal representation against complaints and transfers between forces. The second National Conference of the UK Special Constabulary was held last year in November.

As of this update, the Home Office is considering paying Special Constables for the first time.  The UK is the only country in Europe not to pay its reserves.  In Germany for example, reserves are paid $6.00 an hour, which is tax free.

                      

Rod Attewell

Force Logo

 

 

 

 

 

New York Auxiliaries – April 2001


Rod Attewell
 is a Section Officer (Sergeant) with Thames Valley Police based in Abingdon, Oxfordshire, Great Britain. He has been a Special Constable for 15 years, and is also the Radio Communications Manager of Thames Valley Police in his professional employment.  He is a member of the Reserve Law Officers Association of America, and the International Police Association. He was awarded the Queens Special Constabulary long service medal in 1997. He can be contacted for further information on the UK Police Reserve at:

 E-mail: mailto:RodAttewell@e-mail13.freeserve.co.uk  or by Fax on: +44 1235 526044.


Last modified 13 July 2002

Return to Home Page

Texas Commission of Private Security Rule Change

2002 May 1
by admin

Reserve Law Officers Association of America 
P. O. Box 17807, San Antonio, Texas 78217 

Texas Commission of Private Security
Rule Change Affects Reserves

The Texas Commission on Private Security met in Austin, Texas on Sept.18, 2001. Commissioner Charlene Ritchey moved to adopt the following rule, seconded by Commissioner C. S. “Dusty” Rhodes, and passed unanimously:

430.5 Uniform Requirements

(e) An individual licensed by the Texas Commission on Law Enforcement Officers Standards and Education (TCLEOSE) as a reserve peace officer may only wear the uniform of any political subdivision of the state while not in the employ of such political subdivision if the wearer is performing duties commonly associated with law enforcement or private security and the Texas Commission on Private Security (TCPS) has, through the issuance of a pocket card, authorized the reserve peace officer to engage in such activity.

(f) A reserve peace officer who has met all other requirements for registration with a duly licensed security company, may, with the written permission of the political subdivision with whom the reserve commission is held, wear the uniform of that political subdivision in lieu of the uniform of the company with which he is employed.

(g) A regular peace officer may wear either the uniform of the commissioning political subdivision or any employing company subject only to the requirements of the political subdivision where the commissioning authority resides.

A Sheriff, Constable, or Chief of Police could issue a separate pocket card to each of their Reserves who have Private Security Commission cards to give them permission to wear their uniforms while working private security to contain information similar to the following:

“This is to certify that ___________________ is licensed by TCLEOSE, commissioned by my department,
has been issued a pocket card by the Texas Commission on Private Security authorizing the officer to
engage in performing duties commonly associated with law enforcement or private security, and has
been registered with _________________________________, Security License No. _____________.

This officer has my permission to wear the uniform of this political subdivision while performing such duties.”

 

Signed:__________________________________  Date:__________________

 

Details about RLOAA

2002 April 22
by admin

P.O. Box 17807, San Antonio, Texas 78217-0807
Telephone: 210-653-5754   /   FAX: 210-653-9655

Founded January, 1970 to serve the needs of the third of a million volunteer peace
officers of America, this non-profit fraternal organization is tax exempt under
Internal Revenue Service Code 501(C)4. In the almost thirty-two years of its existence,
the Association has enrolled members in over 2,500 cities and 50 States,
and now has a growing membership in several foreign countries.


Otto Vehle, the National Director
since 1972,  is also Chairman of the
Board of Directors.
      Prior to 1972, he served as Chief of the
Police Reserves in Sherman, Texas.
He then served 27 years in the Support
Division, Bexar County Sheriff’s Office,
San Antonio, Texas.      He is currently a Deputy Constable,
Bexar County Precinct 3.
      He holds a Texas Peace Officer license
with  Basic, Intermediate, Advanced and
MASTER PEACE OFFICER
Proficiency certificates.

 

 

 

Master Peace Officer certification by the State of Texas:

Late in 1960 the Attorney General of Texas ruled that volunteer peace officers
were not legal because the Texas Legislature had never authorized them.

Concerned volunteers from all across the state went to the State Capitol in Austin
to seek help from their Legislators. While there, many of them met other volunteers
for the first time. They all learned that in order to be successful at getting
legislation passed, they needed to band together, prepare their proposals,
and then make a united appeal. Taking this advice, they formed a statewide
organization, the Auxiliary Police and Reserve Law Officers Association of Texas.

President of this group was Otto Vehle, Chief of the Police Reserves in Sherman,
Texas. (For a more detailed history of Otto Vehle, click here: HISTORY.

This organization prepared a Bill and took it to the next Legislative Session. In a
unified group, they testified for the Reserve Law, and it passed, setting minimum
standards of training and education, giving legal status to volunteer law enforcement.

When law enforcement agencies all across America learned of the successful work
done in Texas, Police Chiefs and Sheriffs in many states began to request assistance
in getting similar legislation passed in their states. It became obvious that the
country needed a nationwide organization, so it was decided to change the name from
a Texas group to a new national name, Reserve Law Officers Association of America.
Almost overnight the membership swelled and in its first year members in over
forty states had already enrolled.

Now in its 32nd year, this strong  Reserve Law Officers Association of America, is
the powerful national voice for volunteer peace officers and the many fulltime, paid
peace officers in its membership.

bluline.jpg (2246 bytes)

No ad solicitations

   Anyone who has been connected with law enforcement for any time at
all has heard tales of fraudulent organizations that solicit funds in the
name of police or sheriff departments when in fact they have no
connection to these departments.
We condemn the illegal fundraising which has occurred from time to
time in the name of legitimate law enforcement groups.
Many investigations have shown that the “ads” sold in “boiler rooms”
often never get printed and the money raked in goes to the solicitors
and the promoters.
This obviously proves to be extremely embarrassing to the law
enforcement agency involved, and usually the promoters escape
punishment by means of tricky disclaimers . . . or they just skip town
and set up shop all over again.
 
    
Reserve Law Officers Association of America does not sell
ads, nor does it permit anyone else to do so on its behalf.
This Association operates solely on dues paid by its members.

History of the Reserve Law Officers Association of America

2002 February 22

Where did RLOAA come from?

During the 1960s, a portion of a Texas law said that “no person shall carry a pistol on or about his person or in his saddlebags” unless that person was a Peace Officer. To be a Peace Officer a person would have to be paid $40 per month.

It was not until 1971 that the Legislature changed the law so that auxiliary and/or reserve law officers could operate as they do today.

That legislation was written by a group of volunteer law officers who banded together and formed what is now known as the Reserve Law Officers Association of America.

The Association experienced explosive growth all across America, and during the past 31 years has seen members enroll from 50 states and over 2,500 cities.

RLOAA Assists nationwide

On the national level in the U.S. Congress, RLOAA was able to get volunteer peace officers included in the Public Safety Officers’ Survivors Benefits Act of 1976 which provided the survivors of officers killed in line of duty with $50,000.00. More recently, in the 100th Congress, efforts were successful in getting the survivor benefit increased to $100,000.00.

  • In Louisiana, RLOAA wrote into state law a definition of a Reserve Law Enforcement Officer which resulted in getting volunteers included with the same survivor benefits as all other peace officers in the state.

  • In Iowa, RLOAA helped pass a good reserve law and establish minimum standards of training and education.

  • In Texas, as a result of RLOAA efforts, volunteers were included in the survivor benefits of $20,000.00 plus $100.00 to $200.00 a month for minor children.

  • In Missouri, RLOAA assistance got a law changed benefiting volunteers and helped provide additional pay benefits for full-time officers.

  • When a Bill was introduced in the Nebraska Senate which would have abolished all volunteer peace officers, RLOAA responded to the Sheriff in Omaha, stepped in, got the proposed law defeated, and then helped pass a good Bill providing training and education for Reserves, including funding.

  • In Utah, a similar attack on Reserves was repulsed and replaced by a good law providing for Reserves and their training.

Now in its 32nd year, this Association can look back and realize that when the concepts of volunteer law enforcement have been challenged, a loyal membership has rallied to the call. They joined hands with thousands of other volunteers to give this Association the mighty national clout necessary to change laws. This success has been possible only through the steadfast support of dedicated members who realize that only through this strong, national voice can we continue to improve law enforcement and keep a watchful eye on those who would thwart law and order.

Organized in January, 1970, RLOAA is a non-profit, fraternal organization, exempt from income taxes under 501(C)4 of the Internal Revenue Code. National Headquarters has been in San Antonio, Texas continuously since 1972. Purposes have not changed in 30 years of serving the interests of more than a third of a million American volunteer law officers.

Click here for: Membership Benefits
Click here for: Application for Membership
Click to return to: Home Page    Modified on 22 February 2002

Application for membership – Reserve Law Officers

2002 February 22

 goldstar.jpg (78839 bytes)Reserve Law Officers
Association of America
 (reslaw)

Application for Membership

 Print this form, fill it out, and then mail it with your $25 dues.

Your name:____________________________________________ Date: _____________

Address:________________________________________________________________

City: ________________________________________ State: _____ ZIP:_____________

Home Phone: (___) ______________   Work Phone: (___) _______________

FAX Number: (___) _____________ E-mail address: ____________________________

Pager: (_____) ______________ When does your group meet?______________________

Your law enforcement agency’s name: __________________________________________

I am a bona fide member of a law enforcement agency and in applying for membership in the
Reserve Law Officers Association of America I agree to abide by the Law Enforcement Code of Ethics.

Your signature: ____________________________
JOIN TODAY!
 - Mail this application with $25 for annual dues to:

Reserve Law Officers Association of America, P.O. Box 17807, San Antonio, TX 78217

Return to: Welcome Page                  Updated: 22 February 2002

Membership Benefits – Reserve Law Officers

2002 February 22

Reserve Law Officers Association Insurance Benefits

P.O. Box 17807, San Antonio, TX 78217
(Founded in January, 1970)

A benefit of membership in RLOAA is
Accident Medical Expense protection.

    Every member of the Reserve Law Officers Association of America is covered under a
group accident medical expense policy issued by The Life Insurance Company of
North America, with coverage up to $10,000.00 for individual memberships, and up to
$30,000.00 if the member belongs to a “100% Participating Unit.”
 The accident medical expense policy pays expenses resulting from accidental bodily
injuries sustained while performing assignments in the line of duty as a law enforcement
officer.
If, on account of such injuries, the member requires medical or surgical treatment,
including  hospitalization, X-ray examination, the services of registered nurses or the
use of ambulatory services, the insurance pays the expenses incurred. The policy pays
in excess of any other coverage such as Blue Cross/Blue Shield or other group,
blanket, or franchise insurance.
  There is no deductible.
When a member is injured, he should contact National Headquarters of RLOAA either
in writing or by telephone or fax:
Mail: P.O. Box 17807, San Antonio, TX 78217
E-Mail: reslaw@infohiwy.net
Telephone:  210-653-5754         FAX:  210-653-9655

Advise the office of the date and nature of the injury, name of the law enforcement
agency you are connected with, and whether or not you are a member of a
“100 Percent Participating Unit” in the RLOAA.
The office will partially fill out a Claim Form to be submitted by you to the Claims
Office of INA.  The information the office places on the Claim Form is required by
INA, then fill out the information on the form which applies to you personally, and
then take it to your doctor and/or hospital so they can fill out their portion.
Attach any ambulance, doctor, hospital, or other bill to the Claim Form and mail it
YOURSELF in the special pre-addressed envelope RLOAA sends you.  That envelope
is addressed to the Claims Office which will handle your claim.
If you follow these instructions, the claim will be handled in the shortest possible time.
Deviation from this procedure can delay settling your claim.
Do not send any bills to National Headquarters of RLOAA.  That will only delay
payment as this office will have to send the bills back to you so they will be submitted
with the proper claim form, or added to the claim form previously filed with its number.
Be sure your doctor and hospital send their bills to you, and not to RLOAA.
 
Once our claim is filed, you will be given a claim number by the Claims Office of INA.
Then, if subsequent bills come in (such as for rehabilitation) you can simply send them in
for payment, giving the proper claim number to INA.  Claims handled in this simple way
have been taken care of very promptly.
A reminder: if the Claims Office requests further information from you, respond
immediately because as long as they are waiting for your reply, your claim is held up.
 

JOIN TODAY. Click here for: Application for membership

Click here to return to: Home Page                       Revised 22 February 2002

Membership Benefits – Reserve Law Officers

2002 January 5

Reserve Law Officers Association of America Benefits

 

P.O. Box 17807, San Antonio, TX 78217
(Founded in January, 1970)

The following are a few of many benefits of membership in RLOAA:

  • Up to $30,000.00 in accident medical expense protection for line of duty injuries pay for ambulance,
    X-ray, hospital, doctors, nurses, and other expenses. No deductible.
  • Constant nationwide monitoring of legislative actions which affect law enforcement officers.
  • Gold, red, white, and blue windshield decal depicting the official Association emblem, along
    with an embossed identification card.
  • National and regional NEWSLETTERS to keep members up-to-date.

No advertising sales

This Association operates on membership dues ONLY. No ads are solicited, nor does the Association
permit anyone else to solicit money or ads in its behalf.

RLOAA is careful to protect the integrity of the Association, of its members, and of the agencies
they serve. By avoiding all solicitations, we can prevent embarrassment to Sheriffs, Constables,
and Police Chiefs and their departments which often happens when telephone “boiler rooms”
begin making ad sales pitches. What makes this situation even worse, some unscrupulous operators
don’t even publish the ads they collect for.

Organizational assistance

For years, the Association has provided assistance to law enforcement agency heads in organizing
and upgrading their volunteer peace officer forces. A special manual is available, “How To Organize
And Operate A Law Enforcement Reserve Force”. It has provided many agencies across America
with valuable tools.


Two types of membership available:

[ 1 ] INDIVIDUAL MEMBERS join by sending name, address, ZIP and $25 annual dues. Every member is covered
by group accident medical expense insurance up to $10,000.00. Click 
Application for Membership below.

[ 2 ] 100% GROUP members are enrolled from a complete roster of all members of the volunteer law enforcement group
to which they belong. The roster must give names, addresses, and ZIPs. A single check to pay the dues of the entire group
at $25 per person must accompany the roster. There are several extra benefits for “100% Group” members. First, the
department head should be included on the roster along with the Coordinator or Liaison Officer, but do not pay for them
because Police Chiefs, Constables, Sheriffs and Coordinators memberships are complimentary. The biggest benefit is that
“100% Group” members are provided with an additional $20,000.00 in accident medical expense insurance, making a
total of $30,000.00. Another benefit is that memberships are transferable: if a person leaves the group, the unused portion is
transferred to a new person joining your group. And, if a member is added during the year, the new member’s dues are
pro-rated to the end of the 12-month period. For example: a Group enrolls in July, the Group expires the following July; if
a new member joins the Group in January, his dues are only $12.50 for the remaining 6 months so his expiration date
coincides with the Group.

JOIN TODAY. Click here for: Application for membership

Click here to return to: Home Page                Revised 5 January 2002